Jean Stafford Obituary

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Obituary for Jean Elaine Stafford
Jean Elaine Stafford, 86, of Kissimmee, Florida passed away Wednesday, April 15, 2015. She was born November 20, 1928 in Toledo, Ohio the daughter of Fred and Eunice Lewis. She moved to Kissimmee with her husband Norman in 2014 from Mt. Dora, Florida. Jean was a retired Catering Manager for the University of Toledo for many years.

Jean is survived by her loving husband of over 50 years, Norman G. Stafford of Kissimmee, Florida; son: Martin Stafford (Roberta) of Grand Junction, Colorado; daughters: Susan Stafford of Kalamazoo, Michigan, Janice Trumbell (Brad) of Centerville, Iowa, Debra Kilgallin (William) of Falls Church, Virginia, Cynthia Stafford of Miami, Florida; 6 grandchildren, 2 great grandchildren and 1 great-great grandchild.

A Memorial Celebration of Life Service for Jean Elaine Stafford will be announced at a later date.

The Stafford family is being cared for by: CONRAD & THOMPSON FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATION SERVICES, 511 Emmett Street, Kissimmee, Florida 34741; 407-847-3188.

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Sad Day

I can hardly breath let alone think. The dreaded call came early this morning,  I’m sorry to tell you “mom passed this morning”.  I am numb!

Mom, I’ll love you forever and miss you even more! You were not only my mother but my best friend! Rest in peace Mom. Till we are all together again.

Jean Elaine (Lewis) Stafford

November 20, 1928-April 15, 2015

pink roses

If roses grow in Heaven,
Lord please pick a bunch for me,
Place them in my mothers arms
and tell her they’re from me.

Tell her that I love her and miss her,
and when she turns to smile,
place a kiss upon her cheek
and hold her for a while.

Remembering her is easy,
for I will do it everyday,
but there’s an ache and emptiness within my heart
that will never go away.

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Tarrant County, Texas, is Digitizing Old Court Records for Preservation

Ancestral Paths:

So happy to see this news!

Originally posted on Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter:

Tarrant County, Texas, court files are continuing a years-long effort to make electronic copies of old case files and to destroy most of the paper counterparts. However, a few documents of “famous files” are being digitized but the paper is then preserved.

Tarrant County includes the courts for Dallas and nearby suburbs. Over the years, many famous cases have been aired in the courts of the county, including cases involving the late, famed attorney Melvin Belli who was prevented from representing Jack Ruby, who shot Lee Harvey Oswald. Dozens of other famous files are being preserved, including the Cullen Davis trials in which he was prosecuted for the slaying of his estranged wife’s daughter and in a murder-for-hire scheme in the 1970s; and the Koslow trial, where Kristi Ann Koslow and friends Brian Dennis Salter and Jeffrey Dillingham were convicted of killing her step-mother, Caren, and injuring her father, Jack.

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The Best History Apps

Ancestral Paths:

Fantastic list of History apps!

Originally posted on Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter:

Kate Wiles has posted an article on the HistoryToday web site that probably will interest many genealogists and historians. It is “Our pick of the finest history-related apps for your smartphone or tablet.”

Apps described include Digital Libraries, Tools and Learning, and Interactive. She also provides links to other articles about history apps for smartphones and tablets.

See http://www.historytoday.com/kate-wiles/best-history-apps for Kate Wiles’ list.

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AncestryDNA Launches Revolutionary New Technology to Power New Ancestor Discoveries

Ancestral Paths:

I did my DNA test in August 2014 and have connected with 3 new cousins. I have many 5 to 6 generations back cousins that I haven’t confirmed yet too. This is so exciting!

Originally posted on Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter:

The following announcement and video were created by Ancestry.com:

(PROVO, Utah) – April 2, 2015 – AncestryDNA, the leader in DNA testing for family history, today launched a significant technological advancement that makes discovering one’s family history faster and easier than ever. Now with the easy-to-use AncestryDNA test, customers will have the unique ability to find their ancestors, who lived hundreds of years ago, using just their DNA. Only possible through the groundbreaking work of the AncestryDNA science team, New Ancestor Discoveries is a technical innovation that combines the latest in genetic science, new patent-pending algorithms, and access to AncestryDNA’s extensive database to push the boundaries of human genetics, and help people find ancestors from their past using just a DNA test, no genealogy research required.

“This is the biggest advancement in family history since we introduced our Hint feature, the Ancestry shaky leaf, which scours billions of historical records…

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Naming Patterns

The naming pattern for our ancestors children was generally to name them after the grandparents. In a 1987 edition of the Blair County Genealogical Society Newsletter the following naming sequence was listed. Since I have German ancestors I found the listing interesting and helpful.

English in England

1st son-maternal grandfather
2nd son-paternal grandfather
3rd son-father
1st daughter-paternal grandmother
2nd daughter-maternal grandmother
3rd daughter-mother

Germans in the U.S.

1st son-paternal grandfather
2nd son-maternal grandfather
3rd son-father
1st daughter-maternal grandmother
2nd daughter-paternal grandmother
3rd daughter-mother

Hope this is of help to you.

{source} Blair County Genealogical Society Newsletter; September-October-Novermber 1987; Altoona, PA; Vol. 8; Number 3

 

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Voices from the Days of Slavery, Audio Interviews (American Memory from the Library of Congress)

Wow, what an amazing look into the past! It is not often that we can actually hear how older generations lived.  I didn’t know these interviews existed and thought I would share the link.

Voices from the Days of Slavery, Audio Interviews (American Memory from the Library of Congress).