Tag Archives: miscellaneous

1917 School Blackboard Found

School blackboards from 1917 found in Oklahoma. One board had the following written on it:

“I give my head, my heart and my life to my God and One nation indivisible with justice for all.”

The video of this amazing story here:

http://newsok.com/multimedia/video/4278789881001

A great article and photos posted by Cassandra Lewis:

http://chalkboards.littlethings.com/1917-chalkboards-untouched/?utm_content=bufferd79bc&utm_medium=ContentStoriesNM0602N15&utm_source=ild&utm_campaign=ContentStoriesNM0602N15

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Listed on GeneaBloggers

I am so thrilled to announce that my blog is now listed among the over 3,000 genealogy and family history blogs at  Geneabloggers.com.!

My blog will be highlighted in their weekly New Genealogy Blogs post this Saturday at 9:00 am, central time. So excited!

 

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Why Ancestors Migrated

I read an article called Moving On by Barbara Kransner-Khaitin in a 2001 issue of Family Tree Magazine that was really good. In the article,  she covered the reasons and migration patterns of our ancestors and states that by studying these patterns, they might provide insight into who are ancestors were. 

People and families often moved in large groups for a variety of reasons. Several migrations or “fevers” as they were known were:

Genesee Fever: in the 1790’s the New Englanders moved into the Genesee Vally region of western New York.

Ohio Fever: Harsh weather forced  many New Englanders to move into the fertile farmlands of Ohio after the economic fallout from the War of 1812.

Michigan Fever: Over 200,000 people from New England, western New York, Virginia and North Carolina migrated to Michigan between 1830 and 1840.

Oregon Fever:  More than 350,000 made the 2,000 mile westward trek to new destinations in the west.

Gold Fever: Around the 1850’s, many pushed westward because of financial hardships and hopes of finding gold easily. Little did they know that it would be very difficult and more often than not, would find nothing but more hardships.

As you can see from the above, the reasons for migrating were often economic and weather related.

Getting Started

Are you ready to get started on your research but don’t know where or how to start. Well, start with yourself and then work your way back. Take it one step at a time.

There are two forms, a Pedigree and Family Group Record, that are very helpful to use in your research and can be downloaded free from the LDS Family Search. Just use the index to locate, download and print both forms. Be sure to make spare copies of each, as they will be needed later. These forms are readily available on the Internet at other places and you certainly, do not have to use the ones I’ve linked to. Also, the Family Search forms have listed places for “Endowed, Sealed to Parents, Sealed to Spouse” etc., these sections can be ignored and are not a requirement.

The Pedigree Chart shows your direct family ancestors, you, your parents, grandparents and great-grandparents, etc. Fill out the Pedigree with as much information as you know. List full names, dates of birth and death; locations of birth and death. Put your name on line 1, your father on line 2, your mother on line 3. Your father’s parents on lines 4 & 5 and so on. Your mother’s parents on lines 6 & 7. The male side is listed on the top line and the corresponding female side on the line just underneath. When you have filled in what you can, move on to the Family Group Record.

The Family Group Record is for recording information about a specific individual family that includes all the details about the parents and their children. Fill out one record for each direct family line. One for your parents, your grandparents etc.

Once you have filled in what you know, stop and take a look at what you are missing. Think about who can help fill in the missing information. Talk to your parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, anyone that can help with details. The more information you can get, the better it is!

When it comes to doing research, everything is not always black and white. You have to think about everything with an open mind. Names we know our relatives by could be nicknames not their given names, birth locations could be where they lived, not born and surname spelling could have changed over the years. You have to think out of the box sometimes.

I am going to start adding links to some really great sites for research, some will be free and others will be by subscription. They are all great sites and well worth checking out.